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Posts tagged Bahrain

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'Gays will be barred'

Gulf states to introduce medical testing on travellers to ‘detect’ gay people and stop them from entering the country

  • Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the UAE already outlaw homosexuality, but are toughening their controversial stance
  • Kuwait’s director of public health says ‘gays will be barred’



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2449051/Gulf-states-introduce-medical-testing-travellers-detect-gay-people-stop-entering-country.html#ixzz2h5WKrgcC 

Filed under gays barred medical.test Bahrain Kuwait Qatar Oman Saudi Arabia UAE

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'Critical' rights reforms ignored in Bahrain  

Government has not taken major steps to end torture and review verdicts from military tribunals, rights groups say.

 A week ago, Ali al-Singace, 16, was found tied up and half-naked in a garage in Sanabis, just outside the Bahraini capital; he told neighbours that he’d been beaten, stabbed and sexually assaulted by a group of men, and filed a police report later that afternoon.
Within a matter of days, Singace was back at the police station, but this time as a suspect, not a victim: Prosecutors accused him of filing a false police report. He was accused of inflicting knife wounds on himself, a conclusion attributed to a government doctor who conducted a medical examination.
“Yesterday [Tuesday] we tried to have him examined again, to have another doctor review his case, and they refused the request,” said Faten al-Haddad, Singace’s lawyer.
Rights groups here say that the case raises new questions about the government’s willingness to reform its legal system. Singace says he has been abducted several times before, because he refused to work as a police informant, and that the men who seized him last week were plainclothes detectives. “The police didn’t explain how he managed to tie himself up,” one activist said sarcastically.
The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI) report, released in November, catalogued dozens of problems with Bahrain’s legal system and security forces. Prisoners were routinely held incommunicado, and denied access to their lawyers and families. Torture was routine. Military courts convicted hundreds of people in trials which did not meet basic standards of due process, according to groups like Amnesty International.
The government argues that it has fulfilled most of the report’s suggestions for fixing those problems. “A lot of the major, major ones have been implemented, and you have a lot of them with the ministry of interior, the ministry of justice,” said Abdelaziz bin Mubarak Al Khalifa, an official from Bahrain’s information affairs authority.
But rights groups and lawyers frequently complain about the government’s handling of cases like Singace’s, and that of Abdullah Fardan and Hassan al-Jabber.
more…

'Critical' rights reforms ignored in Bahrain

Government has not taken major steps to end torture and review verdicts from military tribunals, rights groups say.

 A week ago, Ali al-Singace, 16, was found tied up and half-naked in a garage in Sanabis, just outside the Bahraini capital; he told neighbours that he’d been beaten, stabbed and sexually assaulted by a group of men, and filed a police report later that afternoon.

Within a matter of days, Singace was back at the police station, but this time as a suspect, not a victim: Prosecutors accused him of filing a false police report. He was accused of inflicting knife wounds on himself, a conclusion attributed to a government doctor who conducted a medical examination.

“Yesterday [Tuesday] we tried to have him examined again, to have another doctor review his case, and they refused the request,” said Faten al-Haddad, Singace’s lawyer.

Rights groups here say that the case raises new questions about the government’s willingness to reform its legal system. Singace says he has been abducted several times before, because he refused to work as a police informant, and that the men who seized him last week were plainclothes detectives. “The police didn’t explain how he managed to tie himself up,” one activist said sarcastically.

The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI) report, released in November, catalogued dozens of problems with Bahrain’s legal system and security forces. Prisoners were routinely held incommunicado, and denied access to their lawyers and families. Torture was routine. Military courts convicted hundreds of people in trials which did not meet basic standards of due process, according to groups like Amnesty International.

The government argues that it has fulfilled most of the report’s suggestions for fixing those problems. “A lot of the major, major ones have been implemented, and you have a lot of them with the ministry of interior, the ministry of justice,” said Abdelaziz bin Mubarak Al Khalifa, an official from Bahrain’s information affairs authority.

But rights groups and lawyers frequently complain about the government’s handling of cases like Singace’s, and that of Abdullah Fardan and Hassan al-Jabber.

more…

Filed under Bahrain torture

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Congress protests Obama on Bahrain arms sale
Three senators and and 18 representatives — all Democrats — have signed a letter to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemning the deal (and remember, the administration still isn’t saying what equipment, exactly, it’s sending to Bahrain). Here’s the key section of the letter:
more…

Congress protests Obama on Bahrain arms sale

Three senators and and 18 representatives — all Democrats — have signed a letter to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemning the deal (and remember, the administration still isn’t saying what equipment, exactly, it’s sending to Bahrain). Here’s the key section of the letter:

more…

Filed under warmonger obama greed killer Bahrain arms

19 notes &

The Fed Bails Out Gaddafi’s Libyan Bank, Arab Banking Corp. of Bahrain, Banks of Bavaria, Korea and Mexico … But Shafts America
The Federal Reserve Bails Out Fatcat Bankers and Financiers Worldwide … But Shafts the Average American
Fox Business noted in December:

The conflicts of interest and policy controversies in the Federal Reserve’s bailout of the financial system now include helping out millionaires, billionaires, foreign automakers, and companies whose executives sit on the board of directors of the U.S. central bank.
The Federal Reserve also bought more than $2.2 billion in commercial paper from the state-owned central bank of Bavaria, and it gave more than $23 billion in loans to the Arab Banking Corp. based in Bahrain, with an interest rate as low as a quarter of a percentage point. The Federal Reserve also lent more than $9.6 billion to the Central Bank of Mexico.
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Banks worldwide tapped into the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending programs more than 4,200 times for a total of $3.8 trillion, estimates show.

The Fed Bails Out Gaddafi’s Libyan Bank, Arab Banking Corp. of Bahrain, Banks of Bavaria, Korea and Mexico … But Shafts America

The Federal Reserve Bails Out Fatcat Bankers and Financiers Worldwide … But Shafts the Average American

Fox Business noted in December:

The conflicts of interest and policy controversies in the Federal Reserve’s bailout of the financial system now include helping out millionaires, billionaires, foreign automakers, and companies whose executives sit on the board of directors of the U.S. central bank.

The Federal Reserve also bought more than $2.2 billion in commercial paper from the state-owned central bank of Bavaria, and it gave more than $23 billion in loans to the Arab Banking Corp. based in Bahrain, with an interest rate as low as a quarter of a percentage point. The Federal Reserve also lent more than $9.6 billion to the Central Bank of Mexico.

***

Banks worldwide tapped into the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending programs more than 4,200 times for a total of $3.8 trillion, estimates show.

Filed under 4,200 times Banks worldwide $3.8 trillion Mexico Bahrain

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